Deadline Extended – WELL-BEING 2016: Co-Creating Pathways to Well-Being

2nd Call for Papers – Deadline Extended –  Fri 22nd April 2016

 WELL-BEING 2016: Co-Creating Pathways to Well-Being, The Third International Conference Exploring the Multi-Dimensions of Well-Being

Hosted by Birmingham City University, Monday 5th September – Tuesday 6th September, 2016

This year Well-Being 2016 explores the multi-dimensions of well-being focusing on the achievements of well-being through collaboration – to co-create experiences which are positive and meaningful to the individual.

In Well-being 2016, we seek answers to a range of questions about negotiating and navigating the experiences that underpin the achievement of well-being – How positive encounters are or might be embedded in our contact with the environments where we live, learn, play or work;  how individuals are supported in ways that enables them to take control of their personal  well-being; what constitutes a pathway encounter; how are the impacts expressed or captured, the techniques involved, the use of electronic media, verbalisation and narratives or through artistic endeavour, design, making and the crafts, the unique role of the practitioner and the growing relevance of a medical humanities approach?

We aim to provide a platform for dialogue between academics and practitioners, knowledge exchange and methodological exploration through a combination of keynote speakers, breakout sessions and workshops.

For all queries contact wellbeing2016@bcu.ac.uk

Key Themes

  Children’s well-being

  Nature based solutions towards well-being

  The context of the medical humanities

  Recording, representing and evaluating the positive experience

  Mentoring for well-being

  Visioning and future thinking of well-being scenarios

Confirmed keynote speakers

Claire Freeman, Professor at the Geography Department, University of Otago, New Zealand

Kalevi Korpela, Professor of Psychology, University of Tampere, Finland

Dr. Fiona Bannon, Senior Lecturer, School of Performance and Cultural Industries, University of Leeds, UK

Karen Creavin, Head of Wellbeing Services, Birmingham Wellbeing Service, Birmingham City Council, UK

Abstracts invited for

  Posters

  Papers

  Interactive Workshops (45 – 60 mins)

Abstracts for all presentation types may be exploratory in nature or consider the findings of existing studies drawn from academia or practice. They need to address issues relating to well-being, where we are particularly interested to consider new and innovative work, and presented in relation to the type of presentation, the results and their significance.

Authors should provide a clear and brief outline of the paper, including identifying Objectives, Methodology, Results, and Conclusion. For interactive workshops, authors should also explain the activity and the necessary logistics and resources to do so.

Abstracts submission

Abstracts for all presentation types (250 words) should be submitted through www.conftool.net/wellbeing2016/

Abstracts and papers will be blind peer reviewed. All papers, posters and workshops will be included in the conference proceedings with an assigned ISBN.

For more information visit http://www.bcuadvantage.co.uk/events/185/WellBeingConference2016

Download PDF with information

https://www.dropbox.com/s/vtzf4b4v8rc6pkl/Wellbeing2016-PDF-information.pdf?dl=0

 

Well-being 2016 Conference: Co-Creating Pathways to Well-being

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Call for Papers NOW OPEN – Deadline Sunday 10th April 2016

Hosted by Birmingham City University, Monday 5th September – Tuesday 6th
September, 2016

Well-being 2016 explores the multi-dimensions of well-being focussing on the achievements of well-being through collaboration – to co-create experiences which are positive and meaningful to the individual.

In Well-being 2016, we seek answers to a range of questions about negotiating and navigating the experiences that underpin the achievement of well-being – How positive encounters are or might be embedded in our contact with the environments where we live, learn, play or work;  how individuals are supported in ways that enables them to take control of their personal  well-being; what constitutes a pathway encounter; how are the impacts expressed or captured, the techniques involved, the use of electronic media, verbalisation and narratives or through artistic endeavour, design, making and the crafts, the unique role of the practitioner and the growing relevance of a medical humanities approach?​

Download PDF information here

contacts: wellbeing2016@bcu.ac.uk

Conference sub-themes:

  • Children’s well-being – Supporting children’s well-being, children’s own conceptualisations of well-being, children’s voices, experiences of nature and encounters with well-being, interventions and impacts.
  • Nature based design solutions towards well-being – landscape design, restorative environments, environmental interaction, multisensory engagement, sensory flows, fluxes and movement, approaches and case studies.
  • The context of the medical humanities – healthcare design and embedding well-being in a clinical context, the clinical/ humanities interface.
  • Recording, representing and evaluating the positive experience – challenges of evaluation, narratives and visualisations, the IT/web interface, recognising and recording positivity, qualitative versus quantitative approaches.
  •  Mentoring for well-being  Empowerment and giving voice, meditation, mindfulness, actions and engagement, life events and eventful experiences, innovative practices, methods and approaches.
  • Visioning and future thinking of well-being scenarios – the healthy city, community and local actions, citizen engagement, flourishing.

We are interested in how well-being is enacted in everyday events; in unstaged encounters, exercised, devised and practised with key facilitators.

We aim to provide a platform for dialogue between academics and practitioners, knowledge exchange and methodological exploration through a combination of keynote speakers, breakout sessions and workshops.

Download PDF information here

Landscape, Well-being and Environment

For those interested in the Well-being and Landscape topics there is a new book that has just been launched. The muitidimensions of well-being are featured in the book “Landscape, Well-being and Environment” edited by Richard Coles and Zoe Millman.

It is a compilation of studies that were originally presented at the international conference, ‘Well-Being 2011’ jointly hosted by Birmingham City University and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA, which I have attended.

The book considers “current approaches to well-being research and practice that fall outside the traditional concepts of well-being as part of medical research making links with architecture, landscape design, environmental perception, social interaction and environmental sustainability”.

I am reading my copy at the moment – good insights so far. Will post a review when I have finished reading it.

http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415831512/

Urban Allotment Gardens – how many different kinds can we find out there?

I went to Germany for a meeting related to urban allotment gardens, which is a research project I have also been involved for a while. During the field trip, I was really amazed with the type of allotment gardens they have there, so different from the ones I have seen in Portugal and in the UK. Each plot is like a private familiar garden, very very personalized. Check this pictures out. What do you think? How are allotment gardens in your country? Would you like to have or do you have one?

Dortmund-9MAR2013 050 Dortmund-9MAR2013 019 Dortmund-9MAR2013 016 Dortmund-9MAR2013 087

Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe IFLA award goes to Portuguese landscape architect Gonçalo Ribeiro Telles

Portuguese landscape architect Gonçalo Ribeiro Telles was awarded  today in Auckland with the highest landscape architecture award – Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe (IFLA award).

Gonçalo Ribeirto Telles is an envisioned man who since 1960’s has been giving voice and contributing to the development of a landscape policy in Portugal. He  has been responsible by several project across scales, from region-wide landscape  planning to the design of small parks and gardens. Noteworthy is the development of City of Lisbon Green Plan and the Gulbenkian gardens.

GRT

IMG_0510 IMG_0512 IMG_0491 IMG_0471 IMG_0403 IMG_0500 Above: Gulbenkian gardens photos

 

“Keeping an allotment really is good for your health!”

Keeping an allotment really is good for your health!

“I am doing some extra research on allotment gardens and in how they are becoming more and more important within the urban context. So I came across with this article in The Telegraph, from two years ago.

Dutch researchers have found that allotment keepers in their 60s tend to be significantly healthier than their more sedentary neighbours. While plenty of anecdotal evidence exists to suggest growing one’s own fruit and vegetables protects against ill-health, no one had carried out such a direct comparison before.

Agnes van den Berg, from Wageningen University and Research Centre, the Netherlands, said: Taken together, our findings provide the first direct empirical evidence for health benefits of allotment gardens. Having an allotment garden may promote an active life-style and contribute to healthy ageing.

Considering that allotments may play a vital role in developing active and healthy lifestyles, governments and local authorities might do well to protect and enhance them.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/8151638/Allotments-really-are-good-for-your-health.html

Allotment holders on Clapham Common, 1940. Via